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Newport Independent - Newport, AR
Information on the latest research and studies, better-health tips, and advice for children's and seniors' health.
Crafting a healthy digital lifestyle
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Information on the latest research and studies, better-health tips, and advice for children's and seniors' health from GateHouse News Service. Know what the \x34study of the week\x34 means for your health and that of your family, and get plenty of ...
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Information on the latest research and studies, better-health tips, and advice for children's and seniors' health from GateHouse News Service. Know what the \x34study of the week\x34 means for your health and that of your family, and get plenty of fodder to ask your doctor about.
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Create a rule in which there’s a certain time each day, such as dinner, that you don’t use your phone, tablet or other digital device.
Oct. 28, 2013 11:20 a.m.



Tip of the Week



Do you find yourself clicking around on viral videos at work, and all of a sudden, two hours have passed? It may be time to go on a “digital diet.”



But David Ryan Polgar, a West Hartford, Conn.-based attorney, college professor and author of "Wisdom in the Age of Twitter," says crafting a healthy digital lifestyle isn’t as simple as just putting away your phone.



"We have an evolutionary bias towards constantly consuming information," Polgar says. "This is analogous to our rise in obesity — unlimited food, like information, completely overwhelms our limited willpower."



To obtain a deeper level of thinking and get over the fear of missing out when we’re not constantly plugged in, Polgar offers these tips:



• Block distractions. Apps such as Freedom use distraction-blocking software to reduce temptations to check Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other sites when you’re on deadline at work or have a big project to finish.



• No-phone zone. Create a rule in which there’s a certain time each day, such as dinner, that you don’t use your phone, tablet or other digital device. “Families or friends can make a game out of it: First one to touch their phone or tablet does the dishes or buys dinner,” Polgar says.



• Be creative. Stuck in a rut? Take up painting, learn to play an instrument or join a running club.



• Time to reflect. The Internet offers a wealth of information — too much to digest. Polgar suggests going for a walk or meeting with friends over coffee, without the Internet nearby, to aid in mental digestion.



 Keep a tally. "Start thinking about where and when you have your best thoughts," Polgar says. "This should give you greater insight into better ways of achieving a healthy digital lifestyle."



— Amber Krosel, More Content Now

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